D is for Difference

Share our similarities, celebrate our differences.  ~ M. Scott Peck

D is for Difference
enriching our lives
where lifestyles are many
and openness thrives.

DIFFERENCE.  In many religions, everyone believes the same things, everyone behaves somewhat alike, accepting the same three C’s: CREED (list of beliefs), CODE (what is right and wrong), and CULT (ways of worshiping each other).

UU’s are famous for their differences, not for their sameness.  The society has agreed on just seven “principles,” but these basic ideas allow and encourage diveristy.  We are allowed to disagree on what we believe, on what is right and wrong, and on how to worship – as long as we accept what is sometimes called the UU covenant or “The Seven Commitments,” or the “Seven Pricnciples.”

These seven principles which Unitarian Universalist congregations affirm and promote:

  • The inherent worth and dignity of every person;
  • Justice, equity and compassion in human relations;
  • Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations;
  • A free and responsible search for truth and meaning;
  • The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large;
  • The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all;
  • Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.

Newcomers are not expected to change their belief system when they join a UU community, just to make this covenant their own.  They are expected to take part in church life as best they can, to help pay, if possible, the costs of maintaining services and to be tolerant of other people and of opinions other than their own.

“And as you are patient
with our struggles to learn,
with ourselves and each other….
You are the embrace that heartens
and the freedom beyond fear.”

STARHAWK
Singing the Living Tradition #524

Unitarian Universalism is a liberal religion born of the Jewish and Christian traditions.  We believe that personal experience, conscience, and reason should be the final authorities in religion.  Our church acts as a gathering place where people from many faith backgrounds are able to share what they have learned and continue their spiritual growth while working together to create a world based on justice and equality for all.

Our Sunday services are held at 11 a.m. and are followed by coffee and conversation in our community room.  You are welcome here.

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